Department of Biomedical Engineering

Department of Biomedical Engineering

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is involved in wide ranging research, both basic and applied. The varied novel engineering techniques and state-of-the-art technological, scientific and medical know-how generated by the Department have, over the years, proved both useful and beneficial to Israel's medical community. Biomedical engineering utilizes traditional engineering disciplines for the development of medical systems and devices for clinical diagnosis and therapy, and the investigation of the physiological basis of diseases. With the rise in life expectancy and improvement in the quality of life, there has come an increasing demand for better health-related products and services. The biomedical industry is characterized by innovation and sophistication, and the constant search for new challenges. It provides artificial organs, implant devices, cardiac assist devices, diagnostics and therapeutics, catheterization and imaging equipment. Biomedical companies are also involved in molecular and cellular engineering, tissue engineering, plasma engineering, intracellular physiological control mechanisms, drug regulation and drug delivery systems, rehabilitation engineering, and aids for the feeble and the disabled. The Department's Faculty members include 12 full time and 9 affiliated members who are engaged in teaching, and in research and development in BME. Their innovative research activities focus on biomechanics and orthopedics, tissue engineering, rehabilitation engineering, neural engineering and neural interfaces, biological signal processing and imaging, biomaterials, and the cardiovascular system. Additionally, there are 9 adjuncts faculty members from the BME industry and clinical environment who take part in the teaching efforts of the Department.

Research groups and labs can be found here.


Department of Biomedical Engineering

The Department of Biomedical Engineering is involved in wide ranging research, both basic and applied. The varied novel engineering techniques and state-of-the-art technological, scientific and medical know-how generated by the Department have, over the years, proved both useful and beneficial to Israel's medical community. Biomedical engineering utilizes traditional engineering disciplines for the development of medical systems and devices for clinical diagnosis and therapy, and the investigation of the physiological basis of diseases. With the rise in life expectancy and improvement in the quality of life, there has come an increasing demand for better health-related products and services. The biomedical industry is characterized by innovation and sophistication, and the constant search for new challenges. It provides artificial organs, implant devices, cardiac assist devices, diagnostics and therapeutics, catheterization and imaging equipment. Biomedical companies are also involved in molecular and cellular engineering, tissue engineering, plasma engineering, intracellular physiological control mechanisms, drug regulation and drug delivery systems, rehabilitation engineering, and aids for the feeble and the disabled. The Department's Faculty members include 12 full time and 9 affiliated members who are engaged in teaching, and in research and development in BME. Their innovative research activities focus on biomechanics and orthopedics, tissue engineering, rehabilitation engineering, neural engineering and neural interfaces, biological signal processing and imaging, biomaterials, and the cardiovascular system. Additionally, there are 9 adjuncts faculty members from the BME industry and clinical environment who take part in the teaching efforts of the Department.

Research groups and labs can be found here.


Coordinator Prof. Amit Meller

Prof. Amit Meller

Prof. Amit Meller was born in Israel in 1964. He received his BSc in Physics and Astronomy from Tel Aviv University in 1989 (cum laude), and then continued to pursue MSc and PhD in Physics at the Weizmann Institute of Science (1992 and 1998, respectively). In his PhD work he developed an experimental technique for measuring dynamical interactions in colloidal suspensions using dynamic light scattering. After his graduation Dr. Meller joined Prof. Doron Lancet’s laboratory as a postdoc fellow at the Department of Molecular Genetic at the Weizmann Institute, where he help in establishing the Israeli Genome project. In 1998 he moved to Harvard University for his second postdoc in Prof. Daniel Branton’s laboratory at the Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology. At Harvard he was among the first to develop nanopore sensors for single molecule DNA sequencing. In 2001 Dr. Meller started his own research group at the Rowland Institute at Harvard University. The Meller’s group developed and applied single-molecule techniques, such as nanopores and FRET for novel nucleic acids and proteins sensing and characterization. In 2006 Dr. Meller joined Boston University’s department of Biomedical Engineering as a tenured Associate Professor. As an independent researcher at Harvard and Boston Universities Dr. Meller led a number of internationally recognized, multi co-PI’s project funded by the Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP), two R01-funded project by the NIH and four R21 exploratory research awards, as well as three awards from the NSF. In 2010 Dr. Meller returned to Israel joining the Technion as a full professor of Biomedical Engineering. At the Technion he led the German-Israeli Helmholtz Research School SignGene, jointly with scientists in Germany (MDC, Charité and Humboldt Universitat in Berlin) and in Israel (Technion and Hebrew University). Dr. Meller is the director of the first Israeli Center of Excellence (I-Core) in the area of Biological Physics. Funded by the Israeli Science Foundation for a period of 5 years, this center includes 13 faculty members from leading Israeli universities at all ranks, with a strategic mission to form the infrastructure needed to position Israel among the world leaders in biophysics. The Meller laboratory at the Lokey center for Life Sciences and Engineering focuses on development and applications of new methods for the study of biological system from the single molecule to live cells.